4 Escape through the heather

4 Escape through the heather

4 Escape through the heather

 

  We had no time for conversation.‘Come!’ Alan said,and started running along the side of the hill, keeping low to the ground. I followed him like a sheep. We ran and ran, faster than I had ever run before, and my heart was beat ing wildly. Sometimes, to my surprise, Alan straightened his back and showed himself to the soldiers who were chasing us.

  After fifteen minutes, Alan stopped, lay flat in the heather,and turned to me.‘Now,’ he said,‘this is serious. Do what I do,if ye don't want to die’.And just as fast,but much more carefully and secretly, we went back almost the same way that we had come. At last we arrived back in the wood where I had found Alan.

  We fell down in the heather, and lay without moving for a long time.My legs hurt,my head was aching,and I thought I was dead.

  Alan was the first to speak.‘Well,’ he said,‘that was hot work, David.’

  I said nothing. I had seen murder done. I knew that Colin Campbell had been Alan's greatest enemy, and I had found Alan hiding in the wood. Although I didn't think that he had actually shot Campbell,I felt sure that he had planned the killing.I coult not look at him.

  ‘Are ye still tired?’ he asked.

  ‘No,’ I replied, my face turned away from him,‘no, I'm not tired now.Alan,I can't stay with you,I must leave you.I liked you very much, but we're two different people,that's all.’

  ‘Ye must explain what ye mean by that, David,’ said Alan, looking very serious.

  ‘ Alan, why do you ask? You know very well that Colin Campbell is lying dead in the road in his own blood.’

  Alan was silent for a moment,‘Well, Mr Balfour of Shaws,’he said at last,‘I promise ye that I did not plan the murder, or know anything about it.’

  ‘Thank God for that!’ I cried, and offered him my hand.

  He did not appear to see it.I don't know why ye're so worried about a dead Campbell,’ he said. ‘I know that you hate their clan, Alan, but taking a life in cold blood is a terrible thing to do.Do you know who did it?’

  ‘I wouldn't recognize him again,’ said Alan, shaking his head sadly,‘I'm good at forgetting,David.”

  I had to laugh at that.Then I remembered something.‘But when we were running away, you showed yourself to the sol diers, to give the murderer a chance to escape!’

  ‘Any Highlander would do that. The best place for the lad who shot Colin Campbell is the heather,and we must all do what we can to help him keep away from the soldiers.’

  I shook my head at this. These Highlanders were strange,wild people, to be sure. But Alan was ready to die for what he thought was right, and I liked him for that. I offered him my hand again, and this time he took it.

  ‘Now, David,’ he said,‘we must escape too. The Campbells will accuse us both of the murder.’

  ‘But we didn't do it!’ I cried.‘We can prove that in court!’

  ‘Man, I'm surprised at ye,’ said Alan.‘Do ye not know that if a Campbell is killed, the accused has to go to court in Inveraray, in the heart of Campbell country? When the Campbell lawyers have finished with ye,ye'll be dead!’

  This frightened me a little.‘ All right, Alan,’ I said,‘ I'll go with you.’

  ‘But remember,’ said Alan,‘it'll be a hard life. Ye'll have to sleep in the open air, and ye'll often have an empty stomach. Ye can choose-either live in the heather with me,or die at the hands of the Campbells.’

  ‘That's easy to decide,’ I said, and we shook hands on it.

  When we looked between the trees, we could just see the redcoats of the soldiers, still moving away from us across the hills. Alan smiled, and told me that we would go first to the house of his clansman, James Stewart, and then to the Low lands. The Campbells and the English soldiers would not think of looking for us there, and Alan could find a place on a ship sailing to France.

  We walked for several hours, and arrived that night at a large house in a valley.

  There were lights in all the windows,and people were running in and out of the open doors. Alan whistled three times, and we were met at the door by a tall,good-looking man of about fifty, who welcomed us in Gaelic.

  ‘James Stewart, ’ said Alan,‘I'll ask ye to speak in English, because my friend here comes from the Lowlands,and cannot speak Gaelic.’

  James spoke politely to me for a few moments, but soon he turned back to Alan,with a very worried look on his face ‘This is a terrible accident,’ he said.‘It will bring trouble to all of us!’

  ‘Well,man,’ said Alan,‘ye should be grateful that Colin Campbell is dead!’

  ‘Aye,’ replied James,‘but he was killed in Appin, remem ber that, Alan, so it's the Appin Stewarts who'll be accused.And I'm a man with a family!’

  I looked around me. Men with white, frightened faces were hurrying here and there, without any clear idea of what they ought to do first.

  Some were hiding guns and swords, while others were burning papers. When James saw me looking sur prised, he explained,‘The soldiers'll search my house first,ye see, and I don't want them to find anything.’

  We went inside, and met James's wife and children, who were crying in a corner. I felt very sorry for them, but we did not have much time to talk. Alan explained what we needed for our escape, and soon James's men brought us two swords,two pistols, some food, a cooking pot and a bottle of whisky.We needed money too, because Alan had given his gold to an other man to take to France. But James had only a little to give us.

  ‘Ye must find a safe place somewhere near,’ he said, ‘and send me a message. I'll find some more money for ye, and send it to ye.

  But, Alan,’ and here he stopped for a moment,biting his finger worriedly,‘I'll have to accuse ye of killing that Campbell. I'll have to!If I don't, they'll accuse me! I have to think of myself and my family!Do ye see that?’

  ‘Aye,’ said Alan slowly.‘I see that.’

  ‘And I'll have to accuse your friend from the Lowlands too.Ye see that, Alan— say that ye see that!’

  Alan's face went red.‘It's hard on me, James! I brought him here, and now my friends accuse him of murder!’

  ‘But just think,Alan,man!’cried James.‘The Campbells will be sure to accuse him. And I have children!’

  ‘Well,sir,’ said Alan, turning to me,‘what do ye say? If ye do not agree,I won't let James do it.’

  ‘I cannot understand why we don't accuse the man who did kill Campbell,’ I replied sharply,‘but accuse me, Mr Stewart,if you like,accuse Alan,accuse King George!I am Alan's friend, and if I can help his friends in any way, I don't mind the danger.’

  So that night we started our long journey to the Lowlands.Sometimes we walked, and sometimes we ran. But although we travelled as fast as we could,daylight began to appear before we had found a good hiding-place. We were in the rocky valley of Glencoe, with high mountains on both sides,and a river running fast through the middle. Alan was clearly worried.‘The soldiers will find us easily here,’ he said. He looked around,and saw a great rock,about seven metres high. With difficulty we both climbed to the top of it. Then I saw why he had chosen it. The top of the rock was shaped like a plate, and there was room for two or three men to lie there,hidden from people in the valley.

  At last Alan smiled.‘Aye,’ he said.‘Now we have a chance. Ye can sleep for a while. I'll watch for soldiers.’

  But when I woke up, several hours later, the valley was full of redcoats, and Alan was looking worried again, ‘If they go up the sides of the mountains,they'll see us,’he said.‘We'll just have to stay here and hope they don't, When it's dark,we'll try to get past them.’

  That was a terrible day. We lay on the rock, baking in the sun, with no water,only whisky, to drink. We could hear the English voices of the soldiers all around us, but luckily they did not look up at our rock. In the afternoon, when the soldiers seemed sleepy after their lunch, we decided to try to escape, and we climbed very quietly down from the rock. The soldiers did not notice us as we moved carefully from rock to rock, and soon we were safely in the next valley. That evening we washed ourselves in the river, and ate cold porridge, which is a good meal for a hungry man.

  We continued walking eastwards all night, over the great dark mountains. Alan was very pleased that we had left the soldiers behind, and whistled happily as he walked.

  Before daylight we reached a cave that Alan had used before, and here we stayed hidden for five days. Alan went down one night to the nearest village, to the housc of one of his clansmen. He sent this man to James Stewart, to tell him where we were hiding, and after three days the clansman re turned, with a purse of money for us and a message from Mrs Stewart. We discovered that James was already in prison, ac cused of murder, although people were saying that Alan Breck had actually fired the shot. And there was a price of one hun dred pounds on my head, as well as on Alan's.

  I began to think that I would be safer alone. Alan was very recognizable in his fine French clothes. It was going to be dan gerous to stay with Alan, and expensive, too. Mrs Stewart had only managed to send five pounds, and Alan had to travel as far as France. But I still had two pounds, and only needed to reach Queensferry, so I would have to give some of my money to Alan. Staying with Alan meant both danger and ex pense.

  But my honest friend did not think in this way at all. He felt sure that he was helping me. So what could I do, except keep quiet, and hope that everything would be all right?

  We started travelling again, across the mountains, and by daylight came to wild, open moors, covered with purple heather.Because anyone on the hills around us could easily see us when we stood up, we had to walk or run on our hands and feet, like animals It was another hot summer day, and my back achcd badly after a few hours. I wanted a rest and a drink of water, but when we stopped, we saw the redcoats of soldiers on one of the hills, and we had to go on.

  We walked or ran all day and all night. People who talk of tiredness do not know what the word really means, I did not know who I was or where I was going, and I did not care. I thought that every step would be my last, and I hoped that death would come soon.Alan drove me onwards, and I felt that I hated him, but I was too afraid of him to stop and rest.

  When daylight returned, we were stupid with tiredness,and had become careless. Suddenly, three or four wild-looking men jumped out of the heather, and took us prisoner.I was not afraid, only happy to stop running for a moment. But Alan spoke to them in Gaelic.

  ‘These are Cluny Macpherson's men,’ he said quietly to me.‘Ye remember him, the head of the Macpherson clan?They fought well against the English in the Forty-Five.After that, he didn't go to France, like the other clan chiefs.No,he's been hiding here ever since, and the soldiers have never managed to find him. His clansmen bring him what he needs.’

  We were taken to a cave, well hidden by trees and rocks,and Cluny Macpherson himself came forward to welcome us,like a king in his palace. He seemed to live well in his cave,and he offered us an excellent meal, prepared by his cook. But I was too tired to eat, so I lay down at once and slept. In fact,although I did not know it, I was seriously ill, and could not get up for two days.

  I woke up once,in a kind of fog, to find Cluny and Alan playing cards, and a second time, to hear Alan asking to borrow my money. I was too sick and sleepy to refuse, and gave him my purse.

  But when I woke up again, on the third day,I felt much better, although not very strong. I noticed that Alan was looking very ashamed, and I realized at once what had hap pened.

  ‘David,’ he said miserably,‘I've lost all our money at cards, yours as well as mine.’

  ‘No,no,ye haven't lost it!cried Cluny.‘Of course I'll give your money back. It was just a game. I wouldn't keep your money. Here!’ And he pulled gold coins out of his pocket.

  I did not know if it was right to accept the money or not,but we needed it, so I thanked Cluny and put the coins in my purse. But I was very angry with Alan, and as we left Cluny's cave and continued our journey, I refused to speak to him.

  At first Alan tried hard to talk to me. He said that he was sorry, and that he loved me like a brother. He was worried about my health, and offered me a hand when we crossed a river or climbed a hill.But after two or three days,when he realized that I was still angry with him, he too became angry,and laughed at me when I fell, or seemed tired.

  We travelled by night, through endless rain and strong winds, and slept in the wet heather by day. I was feeling more and more miserable.My illness had returned, and I was beginning to think that this terrible journey would only end in my death.‘Alan will be sorry when I die!’ I thought. How childish I was!

  Alan continued to laugh at me and call me names, and by the sixth night I had had enough.I stopped and spoke angrily to him .‘Mr Stewart,’ I said, ‘why do you laugh at me?I should laugh at you! You may have a king's name, but you're a loser! You spend your life running away! You're not brave enough to fight the Campbells and the English, and win!’

  Alan looked sharply at me.‘David!’ he said.‘There are things that ye should never say—things that can never be for gotten!’

  ‘If you don't like what I say, I'm ready to fight,’ I answered stupidly. I knew that I was not strong enough to hold a sword.

  ‘David!’ he cried.‘Are ye crazy? I cannot fight ye! It would be murder!’ He pulled out his sword, and looked at me.‘No, I can't, I can't,’ he said. And he dropped his sword on the ground.

  When I saw how much he loved me, I was no longer angry,only sick, and sorry.I remembered all his kindness to me,and how he had always helped me through difficult times.Now I had lost that friend for ever! My illness seemed to get worse and worse, and I could only just stand. I wanted to say that I was sorry, but I knew it was too late for that. Suddenly I realized that a cry for help was the only way of bringing Alan back to me.

  ‘Alan!’ I said, my voice shaking.‘If you cannot help me,I must just die here!’I did not need to pretend.

  He looked up quickly, surprised.‘Can ye walk?’

  ‘Not without help.Alan,if I die,will you forget what I said?In my heart,I've always been your friend,you know that.’

  ‘ Quiet!’ cried Alan.‘ Don't talk of dying! David, man, ye know… ’He could not go on, but put his arm around me.‘Davie, I'm a bad friend to ye.

  I didn't remember that ye're just a bairn, I couldn't see that ye were dying on your feet…’He was almost crying.‘Hold on to me, Davie, and ye'll be grand.’

  He helped me down into the valley to the nearest house,which luckily belonged to a clan who were friendly to the Stewarts. There I lay for several days, unable to move. Alan refused to leave me, and took the greatest care of me. Little by little I got better, with his help, and before a month had passed, we went on our way again.

  This time we did not argue. We did not see any more soldiers, and our journey was easier now. We walked through the warm summer nights, ate our porridge, drank our whisky, and slept in the dry heather in the daytime.Now that we were in the Lowlands, we were almost safe, and we both felt happy and hopeful.When we crossed the Forth River by boat from Limekilns, we were only five kilometres from Queensferry, where Mr Rankeillor lived.

 

4 在石南丛中逃生

 

  我们连谈话的时间都没有。“来!”艾伦说道,接着沿着山边、伏着身子跑起来。我像一只绵羊一样地跟着他。我们跑啊跑,我从来没有跑这么快过,我的心狂乱地跳着。有时,令我惊讶的是,艾伦站直了腰,故意向追我们的士兵暴露他自己。

  15分钟后,艾伦停下来,平躺在草丛里,对我转过身来。“且听我讲,”他说,“这很严重。如果你不想死的话,照我做的做。”我们又和刚才一样快地、但更当心并更隐密地几乎是原路折回。最后我们又抵达了我以前发现艾伦的那片树林。

  我们倒在石南丛里,一动不动地躺了很长一段时间。我的腿疼,头也疼,我想我要死了。

  艾伦首先开了口。“晤,”他说道,“那可是一件棘手的事,戴维。”

  我没说话。我目击了刺杀。我知道科林·坎贝尔一直是艾伦最恨的敌人而且当时我也发现艾伦躲在树丛里。虽然我认为他没有亲手杀死坎贝尔,但我敢肯定他预谋了刺杀。我当时无法正视他。

  “你是不是还累?”他问道。

  “不,”我答道,把脸从他那边转开。“不,我现在不累。艾伦,我不能和你待在一起,我得离开你。我曾非常喜欢你,但我们是两个不同的人,就这些。”

  “你得解释你那话是什么意思,戴维。”艾伦说道,表情非常严肃。

  “艾伦,你为什么要问?你很清楚科林·坎贝尔正躺在路上血泊里,死了。”

  艾伦沉默了一下。“好吧,鲍尔弗·肖先生,”他最后说道,“我向你保证我没有预谋杀人,也不知道什么。”

  “谢天谢地!”我喊道,并向他伸出了我的手。

  他似乎没有看到。“我不明白你为什么这么关心一个死了的坎贝尔人,”他说道。

  “我知道你恨他们氏族,艾伦,但是蓄意谋杀一个人是一件很可怕的事。你知道是谁干的吗?”

  “我再也认不出他了。”艾伦说道,悲伤地摇摇头,“我很健忘,戴维。”

  对此我只能笑笑而已。接着我又想起来什么了。“但是当我们逃路时,你把你自己暴露给士兵,就是为了给刺杀者一个逃跑的机会!”

  “任何高地人都会那样做的。枪杀了科林·坎贝尔的小伙子的最佳栖身之处就是石南丛林,而且我们应该竭尽全力帮助他从士兵那儿脱身。”

  我对此摇了摇头。这些高地人确实很怪,很野蛮。但是艾伦愿意为他认为对的东西而献身,我喜欢他那一点。我又向他伸出手去,这一次他握住了我的手。

  “听我说,戴维,”他说道,“我们也必须逃跑。坎贝尔人将指责我们俩杀了人。”

  “但是我们没有做!”我叫道,“我们能在法庭上证实那一点!”

  “伙计,我对你感到惊讶。”艾伦回答道,“难道你不知道如果一个坎贝尔人被杀了,被指控的人得去坎贝尔人地域的中心因弗雷里当堂对簿吗?当坎贝尔的律师们和你一起结束工作时,你也就要死了!”

  这使我有点害怕了。“好吧,艾伦,”我说道,“我和你一起走。”

  “但是记住,”艾伦说道,“生活将是艰苦的。你得睡在露天处,还得时常忍饥挨饿。你可以选择——要么和我一起在石南丛林中生活,要么死在坎贝尔人手里。”

  “那很容易决定。”我说道,而且我们俩人握手言定。

  当我们透过树丛看时,只能看见士兵们穿着的红制服还在山峦中移动,离我们渐渐远去了。艾伦微笑着,告诉我说我们将先去他的族人詹姆斯·斯图尔特家,然后再去低地。坎贝尔人和英格兰士兵不会想到去那儿找我们,艾伦也能找到一条开往法国的船。

  我们走了几小时,那个晚上到达了山谷中的一座大房子。所有的窗户都有灯光,人们从开着的门内跑进跑出。艾伦吹了三声口哨,一个约莫五十岁、长相很好的高个儿男人在门口迎接我们,他用盖尔语欢迎我们。

  “詹姆斯·斯图尔特,”艾伦说道,“因为我这儿这位朋友从低地来,并不会说盖尔语,所以请你说英语。”

  詹姆斯很有礼貌地和我说了一会儿,但是很快他又转身和艾伦说话,带着很担忧的神色。“这是一个可怕的意外。”他说道,“它将给我们所有人带来麻烦!”

  “好吧,伙计,”艾伦说道,“你应该感激科林·坎贝尔死了才是!”

  “对,”詹姆斯回答道,“但是他是在阿平被杀死的,记着那一点,艾伦,这样将被指控的是阿平的斯图尔特人。而且我是一个有家室的人!”

  我环顾四周。脸色苍白、面色惊恐的人们一会儿在这儿、一会儿在那儿地操忙着,不清楚他们自己应该先做什么。一些人在藏枪和剑,而另外一些人在烧毁文件。当詹姆斯看见我面带惊讶时,他解释道:“你明白士兵们会首先搜查我的房子,我不想让他们发现任何东西。”

  我们走了进去,遇到了詹姆斯的在墙角大哭的妻小。我为他们感到很难受,但我们没有多少时间来交谈。艾伦解释了我们逃跑所需的东西,不一会儿詹姆斯的人给我们拿来两把剑、两枝手枪、一些食物、一个做饭用的锅和一瓶威士忌酒。我们也需要钱,65因为艾伦已经把他的金子给了另一个人以便带到法国去。但是詹姆斯只有一点儿钱可以给我们。

  “你得在附近某处找一个安全的地方,”他说道,“并给我送一个口信。我会给你再找一些钱,并送给你。但是,艾伦,”说到这儿,他停了一下,焦急地咬着手指,“我不得不指控你杀了那个坎贝尔。我得这样!如果我不这样,他们将指控我!我得为我自己和我家人着想!你明白吗?”

  “嗯,”艾伦慢慢地说道,“我明白那一点。”

  “而且,我也得指控你这个从低地来的朋友。你明白那个,艾伦——就说你明白那个!”

  艾伦的脸红了。“这对我太残酷了,詹姆斯!我把他带到这儿,现在我的朋友们指控他犯了谋杀罪!”

  “但是想想,艾伦,伙计!”詹姆斯叫道,“坎贝尔人一定会指控他。而且我有孩子!”

  “唔,先生,”艾伦说道,向我转过身来,“你意下如何?如果你不同意,我不会让詹姆斯做的。”

  “我不明白我们为什么不指控那个的确杀了坎贝尔的人。”我厉声回答道,“但是如果你喜欢,斯图尔特先生,就指控我,指控艾伦,指控乔治国王吧!我是艾伦的朋友,而且如果我能在任何方面帮助他的朋友们,我不会在意危险的。”

  于是那天晚上我们开始了去低地的漫漫征途。我们有时候步行,有时候疾驰。但是虽然我们尽快走着,在我们找到一个好的栖身之地前天已开始亮了。现在我们在岩石嶙峋的格伦科山谷里,两边高山林立,中间有一条河急湍而过。艾伦显然着急的样子。“在这儿士兵很容易发现我们,”他说道。他看了看四周,看见了一块大岩石,大约七米高。我们俩费劲地爬到了上面。那时我才明白了他为什么要选择这块岩石。岩石的上面像一个盘子一样,可以躺两三个人,以躲过山谷里的人。

  最后艾伦微笑了。“好了。”他说道,“我们现在有个机会。你可以睡一会儿。我来留神当兵的。”

  但当我几个小时后醒来时,山谷里满是英国士兵,艾伦看起来又着急了。“如果他们爬上山侧,他们会看见我们。”他说道,“我们得待在这儿,希望他们别爬上来。天黑时,我们试着超过他们。”

  那一天很难受。我们躺在岩石上,被太阳暴晒着,没有水,只有威士忌喝。我们能听到四周都是士兵们的英语声,但是幸运的是他们没有抬头看我们所在的岩石。下午,趁士兵们用完午饭显得困倦时,我们决定试着逃跑,便从岩石上悄悄地爬下来。当我们小心翼翼地从一块岩石爬上另一块岩石时,士兵们没有发现我们,很快我们就安全地在下一个山谷了。那天傍晚我们在河里洗了洗,喝了冷粥。那对于一个饥饿的人来说是一顿美餐。整个晚上我们继续向东走着,越过了高大漆黑的山脉。艾伦因我们把士兵抛到后面而很高兴,而且走路时高兴地吹起口哨。

  天亮前我们到了艾伦过去用过的一个山洞,我们在这儿待了5天。
一天晚上艾伦下山去了最近的一个村庄里他的一个族人家。他派这个人去詹姆斯·斯图尔特那儿,以告诉他我们的藏身之地;3天后这个族人回来了,给我们带来一袋钱和斯图尔特太太捎来的口信。我们发现詹姆斯已经被捕入狱了,被指控犯有谋杀罪,尽管人们说实际是艾伦·布雷克开的枪。对艾伦和我的人头的悬赏都为100镑。

  我开始想我单独行动会更安全些。艾伦身穿考究的法国衣服,很容易被人认出来。和艾伦待在一起将是危险的,花销也大。斯图尔特太太想尽办法也只弄来5镑,而艾伦还得远去法国。但我还有两镑,而且只需要到昆斯费里,这样我得把我的一些钱分给艾伦。和艾伦待在一起意味着危险和花费。

  但是我的诚实的朋友压根儿不这么想。他确信他在帮助我。这样我除了保持安静、希望一切平安外还能做什么?

  我们又开始旅行了,翻山越岭,到天亮时来到满是紫色石南的、空旷的荒野。因为我们站起来时周围小山上的人能够很容易地看见我们,我们只能像动物一样手脚并用地爬或者跑。这又是一个炎热的夏日,几个小时后我的背痛得厉害。我需要休息,需要喝点水;但当我们停下来时,我们看见其中的一座小山上有士兵们穿的红制服,我们又得走下去。

  整天整夜我们都在走或者跑。说累的人们其实不理解这个词的真实含义。我不知道我是谁或我往哪儿去,我也不在乎。我想每一步都可能是我能走的最后一步,而且我希望死神能够很快来临。艾伦催着我往前走,我感到我恨他,但是我太害怕他,以致不敢停下来休息。

  天又亮时,我们累得都迟钝了,都变得麻本了。忽然,三四个看似粗野的人从石南丛中跳出来,把我们当俘虏抓起来。我不害怕,只高兴能停止跑一会儿。但是艾伦用盖尔语对他们说话。

  “这些是克兰尼·麦克弗森的人。”他低声对我说,“你记得他,麦克弗森家族的头领吗?在1745年政变中他们英勇抗击英格兰军队。那以后,他像其他部族领袖一样没有去法国。对,那以后他一直躲在这儿,士兵们也从来没有发现他。他家族的人给他提供他所需要的。”

  我们被带到一个被树木和岩石遮掩得很好的山洞,克兰尼·麦克弗森像一个国王在他自己的王国里一样上前欢迎我们。看起来他在洞穴里过得很好,他给我们提供了一顿由他的厨师准备的佳肴。但是我太累了,吃不下,于是我立即躺下来睡觉。事实上,虽然我不知道,但是我是得了重病,两天都不能起床。一次我醒来,如坠雾里,发现克兰尼和艾伦在打牌;又有一次,听见艾伦向我借钱。我病得太厉害,又太困,不能够拒绝,把我的钱包给了他。

  但在第三天,当我又醒过来时,我感到好多了,虽然还不太强壮。我注意到艾伦看起来很羞愧,我马上意识到发生了什么。

  “戴维,”他悲惨地说道,“我玩牌输掉了我们所有的钱,你的和我的。”

  “没有,没有,你没有输钱!”克兰尼叫道。“我当然要退你钱。只是玩玩而已。我不会要你的钱。给!”他从口袋里掏出金币。

  我不知道接受钱是对还是不对,但我们需要它,于是我谢过克兰尼并把金币放到我钱包里。但是我对艾伦很生气,我们离开克兰尼的山洞继续旅行时我拒绝和他说话。

  最初艾伦竭力试着对我说话。他说他很抱歉,说他像兄弟一样地爱我。他很担心我的健康,我们过河或者爬山时他主动伸手要帮我一把。两三天后,当他意识到我仍对他生气时,他也变得生气了,我跌倒或显得疲倦时他嘲笑我。

  无论强风淫雨,我们都趁着夜幕行走,到了白天便在潮湿的石南丛里睡觉。我感到越来越难受了。我的病又复发了,我开始寻思这次可怕的旅行只会以我的死亡而告终。“当我死了,艾伦或许会伤心的!”我想。我多么孩子气啊!

  艾伦继续嘲讽我并谩骂我,到了第六天晚上我实在是受够了。我停住脚,很生气地对他说话。“斯图尔特先生,”我说,“你为什么嘲笑我?我应该笑话你!你有国王的姓氏,但你却是输家!你把所有的时间都花在东藏西逃上!你没有勇气来和坎贝尔人及英格兰人战斗,也不会打胜仗的!”

  艾伦严厉地看着我。“戴维!”他说道,“有很多事情你根本不应该说——有些事情说了之后是永远不会被忘却的!”

  “如果你不喜欢我说的话,我准备决斗,”我傻呵呵地答道。我知道我连拿剑的力气都没有。

  “戴维!”他叫道,“你疯了吗?我不会与你决斗的!那将是谋杀!”他拔出剑,看着我。“不,我不能,我不能,”他说道。他还把剑扔到地上。

  当我看到他是多么爱我时,我巳经不再生气了,只是难受,并感到抱歉。我记得他对我的所有好处,而且他总是帮我渡过难关。现在我永远地失去了那个朋友!我的病愈来愈重了,我只能站站而已。我想说对不起,但我知道太晚了。忽然,我意识到一声求助是把艾伦带回我身边的唯一办法。

  “艾伦!”我说道,声音颤抖着。“如果你不能帮我,我就一定死在这儿了!”我不需要伪装。

  他很快地抬起头,惊讶的样子。“你能走吗?”

  “没人帮忙就不行。艾伦,如果我死了,你能忘掉我所说过的话吗?在我内心里,我一直是你的朋友,你知道的。”

  “悄声!”艾伦叫道,“别提死!戴维,伙计,你知道……”他说不下去了,但用胳膊搂着我。“戴维,我是你的坏朋友。我当时记不得你只是一个小孩,我不能看着你暴死……”他差不多哭了。“抓牢我,戴维,而且你会好的。”

  他帮助我下了山,进了山谷,来到最近的一座房子里。房子庆幸属于一个对斯图尔特人很友好的部族。在那儿,我躺了几天,不能动弹。艾伦拒绝离开我,并极细心地照顾我。在他的帮助之下,我的身体一点点地好起来了;不到一个月,我们又上路了。

  这一次我们不争辩了。我们再没看见士兵,我们的旅途如今容易多了。温暖的夏夜我们行走,吃麦片粥,喝威士忌;白天则睡在干燥的石南丛中。既然我们处于苏格兰低地,那就几乎安全了,我们二人都感到高兴,心里充满了希望。当我们乘船从莱姆基恩渡过福斯河时,我们离昆斯费里,就是兰基勒先生居住的那儿,只有5公里路了。